Leave a Lasting Legacy

Your North West Air Ambulance Charity attends over 2,000 missions each year and relies on the donations of our amazing supporters to help keep us flying.

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You can help your North West Air Ambulance Charity be on the scene in minutes through a gift in your Will, however large or small, and the effect will last for generations.

Your North West Air Ambulance Charity attends over 2,000 missions each year and relies on the donations of our amazing supporters to help keep us flying. 1 in 6 of these missions are helped through our supporters remembering us in their Will.

And remember every gift in every will makes a difference however large or small. So considering a small gift such as a few pounds or just 1% of your estate will help our North West Air Ambulance Charity for future generations.

If you would like more information then please do get in touch with us by email legacies@nwaa.net or call 0800 587 4570.

Case studies

  • Heather Arrowsmith
  • Kim March
  • Chief Executive Heather Arrowsmith understands how important gifts in Wills are to your North West Air Ambulance Charity. “I’ve been blown away by the support our local community provides to our fantastic charity. Thanks to you, our amazing supporters, we have attended over 20,000 missions since we started in 1999. Each year 1 in 6 of our missions are helped through gifts in Wills – imagine what we could achieve together in the next 30 or 60 years through a gift in your will.”

  • Kim March, is a Trustee at our North West Air Ambulance Charity. As a solicitor, Kim knows all too well the importance of considering a Will to take care of loved ones, as well as the phenomenal support our charity receives year on year through those who also consider us in their Will.

    Kim says; “Writing a Will is an easy process, particularly with the support of a solicitor. By focussing on personal circumstances first and foremost having a Will gives you the peace of mind that your loved ones are looked after in the future. Perhaps like countless others you will also consider leaving a special gift to our North West Air Ambulance Charity too.

    “Every day we typically attend six missions in the North West, this means at least one person every day is helped due to those considering us in their Will.

Our Legacy Promise

A legacy to your North West Air Ambulance Charity is a promise to ensure we can continue our life saving missions for years to come.  A promise that will see us arrive at incident scenes in minutes to deliver pre-hospital care and offer the hope of better outcomes for our patients.

In return, here is our promise to you.

  • We know that your family and friends are important and understand that you everyone hold dear comes first.
  • We are grateful for every single penny that is given to your North West Air Ambulance Charity. We will spend your money wisely and ensure it makes the most impact on delivering lifesaving missions.
  • We respect that this is your decision, and you need to carefully consider leaving a gift in your will in your own time.
  • We will always respect your privacy and appreciate your will is personal to you. Any personal information you choose to give us will be handled securely, confidentially and with the utmost respect.
  • We will be happy to tell you or your family how gifts in wills help your North West Air Ambulance Charity.
  • We are discreet and will always keep your decision completely confidential. You don’t have to tell us what you decide to do, but it can help us plan for the future and will allow us to thank you if you do remember us in your will.

Thank you so much for considering this way of giving, with your help today our North West Air Ambulance Charity can continue to be on the scene of incidents in minutes and through a gift in your will – however large or small – the effect will last for generations.

There are many ways you can consider leaving a gift to your North West Air Ambulance Charity

There are many different ways you can consider leaving a gift to your local Air Ambulance in your Will.

Conditional:  A gift conditional upon a certain event taking place.

Discretionary:         Where you allow your executors or trustees to choose who will benefit under your Will.

Pecuniary:               A gift of money; if it is index-linked it will help retain its value.

Residuary:               What is left of the estate after all other legacies, tax debts and costs have been paid.

Specific:                   A specific gift which is identified – ie house, car, jewellery etc.

What do I say in my Will if I want to leave a gift in my will..?

Any information we receive will be treated with the strictest confidence, however we recognise that you may prefer to do this privately.

If you are considering leaving us a legacy then the wording below can be used in your Will. Please remember, we always recommend that you take professional advice to ensure the legacy meets your personal circumstances. Residuary gift – after you have provided for your family and friends you can leave a share of your estate to us. Please note you can leave 1% or 100% or anything in between – whatever suits your circumstances, and remember every gift no matter how large or small makes a difference.

I give a ___% share of the residue of my estate to our North West Air Ambulance Charity to be used for its general charitable purposes and I declare that the receipt of their Treasurer or other proper officer shall be a full and sufficient discharge.

Cash gift – after you have provided for your loved ones you make chose to leave a fixed amount of money to us – remember whatever suits your circumstances, and remember every gift no matter how large or small makes a difference.

I give free of tax to our North West Air Ambulance Charity (Registered Charity number 1075641) the sum of £[words and figures] to be used for its general charitable purposes and I declare that the receipt of their Treasurer or other proper officer shall be a full and sufficient discharge.

Changing your Will (A codicil)

If you already have a Will and want to leave a gift to your North West Air Ambulance Charity, all you have to do this amendment is make a ‘Codicil’. We have created a simple template to help you with this, and if you would like to use this codicil it is important to take the advice of your professional adviser to ensure it meets your wishes and does not conflict with your existing Will. A cash gift can easily be added in minutes. If you would prefer to leave us a percentage legacy (called residuary) it might be better and even as cheap just to contact your professional adviser and express your wishes.

View Codicil

FAQs

How will the North West Air Ambulance Charity use my gift? When we receive your legacy gift, we promise to use it in the most cost effective manner to ensure we are able to deliver quality lifesaving pre-hospital care where it is need most.

When is a good time to make my Will? Any time is a good time to make a Will. Surprisingly, many people die without making a Will, which means family or friends left behind may face some tricky problems. By making a Will now, you can have the peace of mind that you have protected your estate and provided for your loved ones.

What type of gift is best? Every gift in every Will makes a difference however large or small. A residuary gift (what is left of the estate after all other legacies, tax debts and costs have been paid) is popular with many of our supporters because it ensures your loved ones are taken care of first and foremost. Considering a small gift such as a few pounds or just 1% of your estate will help your North West Air Ambulance Charity for future generations.

Who should act as an executor of my Will? Executors are the people who will carry out your wishes in accordance with your Will. You can appoint anyone you like, perhaps a close friend or family member, but make sure you ask them first. Some people prefer to appoint a professional executor, like a bank or solicitor, but we advise you to be aware of the amount they’ll charge for this service before you decide.

Do I need to draw up a new Will? If you do not wish to alter your existing Will other than to include a gift to Sense, you can amend your Will by preparing a document called a Codicil. We recommend that you consult a solicitor to ensure that the Codicil is valid and your wishes will take effect. By using our suggested wording for a Codicil Form, you will ensure that your gift is valid.

Can a gift to charity help me pay less tax? Technically, yes. Gifts to UK registered charities are exempt from Inheritance tax. We strongly recommend you speak with your Solicitor for any advice on tax issues.

Do I have to let you the North West Air Ambulance Charity know I have left them a gift in my Will? You are not obliged to inform us of any decision you make on leaving a gift to your local Air Ambulance. If you are happy to share this information with us it does enable us to thank you for your support. Letting us know also helps us to plan for the future and keep you informed about our ongoing work.

What happens if I change my mind? You are free to change your mind at any time. Letting us know you plan to leave a gift in your Will to your local Air Ambulance doesn’t commit you to doing so.

We understand that the language used in Wills can be complex, so we’ve pulled together a list of the most common terms you may come across. If you are in any doubt about anything you read here your solicitor will be able to help you.

Glossary

Assets: Everything that you own, i.e. your house, money, investments and personal possessions like furniture and jewellery.

Beneficiaries: All those people, organisations and charities you wish to benefit under the terms of your Will. Beneficiaries can also be referred to as legatees.

Codicil: A simple legal document adding to, or altering, an existing Will. A codicil is used where only a minor change is needed and there is no need to make a new Will, we have prepared a simple example that can be found

Court of Protection: A division of the Supreme Court which exists to manage affairs of those who are incapable of managing or administering their own financial affairs.

Contingent Legacy: A gift that is dependent on an event that may or may not happen. For example, if the testator outlives an intended beneficiary, a gift might pass instead to a nominated charity. Estate: The total sum of your possessions, property and money left at your death after debts and/or expenses connected with his/her death have been taken into account.

Executor(s): The people you appoint to carry out the terms of your Will. It is usual to appoint two people, but you can appoint up to a maximum of four. Executors can benefit under the terms of the Will.

Guardian(s): The person(s) appointed in a Will to look after his/her children if there is no-one else with parental responsibility to do so.

Inheritance Tax: The 40% tax paid when you die on the proportion of your estate that is over the nil-rate band threshold. This threshold varies every tax year. It can be avoided or reduced by leaving a legacy to a charity as all gifts in your Will to charity are free of inheritance tax.

Intestate: If you die without a Will, the law declares intestacy and decides how your assets will be distributed, regardless of your wishes.If you do not have any surviving blood relations the state will apply for your estate.

Legacy: Any gift you leave in your Will to a person or charity.

Liabilities: All your debts, including your mortgage and other money you owe.

Life interest: The right of a beneficiary to benefit from part or all of your estate for their lifetime. For example, in your Will you give a relative/friend the right to live in a property for their lifetime.

Probate: The legal process by which your Executors administer your estate in accordance with your Will.

Residue: The total sum of your possessions, property and money left at your death after debts and gifts of fixed sums to beneficiaries have been paid.

Solicitor: A professional person who meets the standards set by the Law society and is qualified to undertake legal work including Wills and probate. Solicitors are regulated by the Law Society.

Testator: A person who has made a Will.

Trustee(s): The people you appoint to administer and manage any trust you set up. Usually the same people as the executors, trustees can benefit under the terms of the Will.

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